Oznium.com Store
Oznium Forum
The value of this forum is in the interaction with your fellow LED lighting enthusiasts.
Register today! - It is FREE and quick

Are Coaxial Speakers and Midrange Speakers the Same Thing???

Author
Message
Trans_Am_13

Joined: Aug 15 2007
Posts: 187
Location: Texas


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Wed Aug 15, 2007 5:42 pm

Can someone tell me the difference between Coaxial speakers and Midrange speakers? Is there a difference at all? I'm trying to buy either one or the other or both, so I can hear the actual music and lyrics instead of just the bass. I have 6x9's, Tweeters, and two 10's but I still get mostly bass. Thanks...
bad venge

Joined: Jul 28 2007
Posts: 3550


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Wed Aug 15, 2007 6:25 pm

Coaxial speakers are a midrange driver with a tweeter mounted in the middle ....
There are also component speakers that have the mids and tweeters seperately with a crossover to divide the frequencies
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
Posts: 4407


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Thu Aug 16, 2007 5:43 am

Coaxial speakers are two speakers that share the same central axis, hence the name. What bad venge said is pretty much correct with the exception of 6x9 coax (because 6x9's aren't really midrange drivers). From what you're said, I would buy some 4" or 5.25" component speakers. Then install those and replace your current tweaters w/ the ones from the components. That should give you more mids, but you're still going to have overpowering bass w/ two 10s and 6x9s (both are bass drivers).
kornholio788

Joined: May 02 2005
Posts: 9748
Location: Tosa, WI


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Thu Aug 16, 2007 6:13 am

^^^^what he said is true...but i have kicker components with the tweets custom mounted in the door and i have them powered by a 200 watt kicker amp. You have to amp the components in order for them to sound good and get he full potential out of them....BUT you comment about the overpowering bass. I have 4 way 6x9s and 2 12in JL audio W3 woofers. Those compontents get PLENTY loud and are very crisp and sharp and the subs do not over power them. If u set it up correcty and tune it correctly you car will sound great. I currenty am running a total of 12 speakers in my car and let me tell u..it sounds amaznig lol
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
Posts: 4407


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Thu Aug 16, 2007 7:26 am

^
I'm not trying to say you can't make the midrange w/ coax 6x9's. It would be a lot easier to have something like tweeter (20kHz-5kHz), 4"(5kHz-800Hz), 6x9(800Hz-100Hz), and 10"(100Hz-20Hz) then tweeters and 6x9's. With a midrange speaker, you wouldn't have to drive them as hard to get the desired output. I'm sure kornholio788 and most people would agree that if you already have enough bass get some 4" or 5.25" components. You will need an amp just like kornholio788 said.

Side Note: I'm not a fan of coax speakers b/c it "muddies" up the music unless you can time delay the speakers. I run special "tweeters", 4", 6.5", and a 10" and I have flat response from 20kHz-27Hz with ZERO coax speakers.
kornholio788

Joined: May 02 2005
Posts: 9748
Location: Tosa, WI


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Thu Aug 16, 2007 9:43 am

i currently run a kicker component set(6in mids and seperate 2.5in tweets) powered by a 200 watt amp, 2 sets of 4in pioneers in the front, 6x9 4 ways in the rear, and 2 JL Audio 12w3v3 12in woofers pushin 460 watts bridged. It sounds amazing...the highs are great..i love it
Trans_Am_13

Joined: Aug 15 2007
Posts: 187
Location: Texas


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Thu Aug 16, 2007 11:27 am

I guess I'm going to buy the 6" coaxials. Are 3.5 in speakers even worth buying??? That's the only size I think I can fit in my dash. I'm trying to keep my system Kicker Products only...
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
Posts: 4407


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Thu Aug 16, 2007 11:31 am

^
Depends on the speaker. I have a 3.5" that I got from work that has 26mm of excursion. Generally, 3.5" will get you a good chunk of the mids. Most likely down to around 1kHz, but that's just a generalization.
bad venge

Joined: Jul 28 2007
Posts: 3550


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Thu Aug 16, 2007 1:08 pm

I mounted the component tweeters in the 3.5" holes by making adapter plates ... they scream bouncing of the windsheild really helped my front sound stage
Cooper

Joined: Mar 19 2006
Posts: 1770


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Sat Aug 18, 2007 2:04 pm

Mid-range refers to the frequency response of the speaker . Usually speakers with a cone size between three and half and six inches are what would be considered mid-range speakers . They reproduce the 'mid' frequencies: vocals, guitars, some higher percussion, etc . This is in contrast to low-range speakers (subwoofers) that typically have larger cone sizes, and high-range speakers like tweeters which are usually very small .

Co-axial refers to the physical design of the speaker, not what frequencies its used for . A co-axial speaker is has two or more drivers (speakers) on the same center axis . Often the bottom, bigger cone has the center removed and the smaller speaker is mounted in front of it on a stalk . Other times the smaller driver is attached to the basket with some kind of clip-like design . Compare to component speakers, which also have multiple drivers but each driver is mounted separately .

An example of a component design . Instead of the tweets being mounted in the center of the larger mid-range speaker they're designed to be mounted separately . The two big boxes in the picture are crossovers, they divide the music up between the two big and two small drivers, sending the highs to the small speakers and the mids to the larger speakers .

Advantage of a component design is that you can mount anywhere, typically up high in the door panel, the dash, or the a-pillar of the car . High frequencies are very directional so this way you get the sound aimed right at your head .
If you have a co-axial design it can be hard to mount the speakers in such a way that the tweets are aimed at your listening position since most mounting locations for front speakers and down by your shins or your knees, not near your head .
Advantage of the co-axial design though is the sound from both speakers appears to be coming from the same location . With the component design if you mount the tweeters too far from the mid-range speaker the sound tends to lose its timing and directionality .
Cooper

Joined: Mar 19 2006
Posts: 1770


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Sat Aug 18, 2007 2:17 pm

PwrRngr wrote:
Side Note: I'm not a fan of coax speakers b/c it "muddies" up the music unless you can time delay the speakers. I run special "tweeters", 4", 6.5", and a 10" and I have flat response from 20kHz-27Hz with ZERO coax speakers.


Why do you feel the co-axial design muddies up the music ? They're on the same axis so I don't understand why you think they would need to be time corrected . In a component design, as the drivers are moved farther apart, the need for time correction increases to make up for the varying distances between the listening position and the various drivers .
True time correction could help in a co-axial setup, but I think the need is less, not more, than a component setup .

PwrRngr wrote:
Depends on the speaker. I have a 3.5" that I got from work that has 26mm of excursion. Generally, 3.5" will get you a good chunk of the mids. Most likely down to around 1kHz, but that's just a generalization.


What model is that driver, and do you mean one-way or peak-to-peak excursion ? 26mm xmax is almost unheard of in a 3.5" driver and I'd guess the driver would have to be -very- well made to give any kind of accuracy with that much travel .
Trans_Am_13

Joined: Aug 15 2007
Posts: 187
Location: Texas


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Sat Aug 18, 2007 2:19 pm

Thanks..... biglaugh.gif
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
Posts: 4407


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Sat Aug 18, 2007 9:22 pm

Cooper wrote:
Why do you feel the co-axial design muddies up the music ? They're on the same axis so I don't understand why you think they would need to be time corrected .


Example, if I have 4 coax speakers in a car and they are located 2 in front and 2 in back. That means I have 4 speakers playing the highs and the timing will be off causing the music to sound "muddy." If I have no coax speakers, I have speakers designated for the highs, mids, and lows w/ minimal overlap between the speakers.

Cooper wrote:
What model is that driver, and do you mean one-way or peak-to-peak excursion ? 26mm xmax is almost unheard of in a 3.5" driver and I'd guess the driver would have to be -very- well made to give any kind of accuracy with that much travel .


I do mean 26mm Xmax and it's only a 3.5", that's why it's amazing. There is actually no spider, just two surrounds. The driver is from the JBL Pro series. It is very well made and very expensive w/out a discount. I work at Harman/Becker so I can get the latest and greatest JBL/Infinity to come.
The time now is Mon Sep 24, 2018 10:59 pm
Page 1 of 1