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led brake lights?

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ozzie84

Joined: Jan 29 2008
Posts: 25


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Post Mon Mar 31, 2008 10:54 am

does anyone know if its possible to make any led strip, or pods into a brake light????
if it can....it would be installed on my honda ruckus(moped)
Kierra

Joined: Mar 01 2008
Posts: 1345
Location: Cherry Hill, South Jersey


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Post Mon Mar 31, 2008 11:44 am

Its possible to make one, yes. Its just a matter of hooking it up to the correct wires, and working with resistors and such to make it dim when not braking, and brighter when the brake is applied.

Search the forums via the 'Search' feature at the top of the forum page to see if anyone has already asked this question.
ozzie84

Joined: Jan 29 2008
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Post Mon Mar 31, 2008 12:35 pm

well i couldnt find anything....
but if anybody knows, it would be greatly appreciated
Chris

Joined: Sep 27 2004
Posts: 2395
Location: NY


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Post Mon Mar 31, 2008 1:57 pm

Dude, chill out on all the posts. The blue turn signal one should work.
ozzie84

Joined: Jan 29 2008
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Post Mon Mar 31, 2008 2:04 pm

oh sorry...
but thanks
Jump1979man

Joined: Apr 03 2008
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Post Thu Apr 03, 2008 12:47 pm

I just bought some led's from oznium myself and am wondering the same thing.

My motorcycle has 3 wires coming out to the brake light while these LED's only have 2.

I can get the LED to light up and stay on but they do not get brighter when the brake is pushed.

I have blown several fuses trying different combinations, if anyone can help I would appreciate it.

I have searched this site high and low and havent found anything yet as well as just searching the internet through google...someone has to know how to do this.

thanks,.
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
Posts: 4407


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Post Thu Apr 03, 2008 12:55 pm

Jump1979man wrote:
I just bought some led's from oznium myself and am wondering the same thing.

My motorcycle has 3 wires coming out to the brake light while these LED's only have 2.

I can get the LED to light up and stay on but they do not get brighter when the brake is pushed.

I have blown several fuses trying different combinations, if anyone can help I would appreciate it.

I have searched this site high and low and havent found anything yet as well as just searching the internet through google...someone has to know how to do this.

thanks,.


What are the three wires? What color are they and what is the voltage of each? I would assume one is 12V from brakes, one's ground, and one's running lights (most likely 12V?).

Assuming the above is correct....
Wire a resistor and in series from the running lights to the positive of the LEDs. Connect the brake wire to the positive as well (no resistor). Connect the negative of the LEDs to the ground wire. Wham Bam Thank You Ma'am, you're in business.
Jump1979man

Joined: Apr 03 2008
Posts: 4


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Post Thu Apr 03, 2008 8:37 pm

PwrRngr wrote:
Jump1979man wrote:
I just bought some led's from oznium myself and am wondering the same thing.

My motorcycle has 3 wires coming out to the brake light while these LED's only have 2.

I can get the LED to light up and stay on but they do not get brighter when the brake is pushed.

I have blown several fuses trying different combinations, if anyone can help I would appreciate it.

I have searched this site high and low and havent found anything yet as well as just searching the internet through google...someone has to know how to do this.

thanks,.


What are the three wires? What color are they and what is the voltage of each? I would assume one is 12V from brakes, one's ground, and one's running lights (most likely 12V?).

Assuming the above is correct....
Wire a resistor and in series from the running lights to the positive of the LEDs. Connect the brake wire to the positive as well (no resistor). Connect the negative of the LEDs to the ground wire. Wham Bam Thank You Ma'am, you're in business.


Awesome thanks man!

You are correct as I would assume myself too that one is brake, one is running, and one is ground...

I plugged it into one and it stays on so I thought if I plugged it into the other it would come on when I hit the brake but that didnt work so I dont know for sure....

The wires arent really colored normal they are on a 2002 Honda cbr600F4i....

What size resistor should I use? Thanks for your help!
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
Posts: 4407


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Post Thu Apr 03, 2008 8:46 pm

I don't know that resistor to use. It depends on the current you're drawing, which depends on what LEDs you're using. What LEDs are you using? I would guess it would be somewhere around 100 ohms but it really depends on what LEDs you're using. Let me know and I can give you a better estimate.
Jump1979man

Joined: Apr 03 2008
Posts: 4


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Post Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:05 am

I am using these chrome led modules...

https://www.oznium.com/led-bolts-prewired-leds/led-modules

2 of them. The bikes wire harness has two connections with 3 wires a piece.
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
Posts: 4407


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Post Fri Apr 04, 2008 9:12 am

Well, it doesn't say the current draw on the page but I bet I can figure it out. Looking at the picture there are 6 LEDs and two resistors on each module. So, I'm assuming there are two "branches" in parallel with 3 LEDs in each "branch." I would say each module would pull 40mA each. Since you're using two, wire them in parallel and it'll pull 80mA.

Resistance = (Voltage)/(Current)

Say you want a 5-7 volt drop on the running lights. That would put the resistance anywhere from 60-80 ohms.
nate-00neon

Joined: Dec 10 2007
Posts: 135


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Post Fri Apr 04, 2008 11:20 am

PwrRngr wrote:
Well, it doesn't say the current draw on the page but I bet I can figure it out. Looking at the picture there are 6 LEDs and two resistors on each module. So, I'm assuming there are two "branches" in parallel with 3 LEDs in each "branch." I would say each module would pull 40mA each. Since you're using two, wire them in parallel and it'll pull 80mA.

Resistance = (Voltage)/(Current)

Say you want a 5-7 volt drop on the running lights. That would put the resistance anywhere from 60-80 ohms.


**** dude howd u know that?!?!?!?!?
lol thats good u know your electrical
robbie

Joined: Apr 23 2006
Posts: 5754


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Post Fri Apr 04, 2008 11:22 am

Dude this guy is amazing. YOu need something like this done or figured out contact him. PwrRngr with electrical FTMFEW!!!

BTW: PwrRngr be looking for a pm from i have a few questions. Thanks End thread jack.
mx107marlin

Joined: Aug 12 2007
Posts: 3095
Location: Fairborn, OH


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Post Fri Apr 04, 2008 12:00 pm

Haha, another quality post by PwrRngr...

It's funny though, a lot of this stuff is high-school level electrical knowledge.. it's just that most people forget it because they don't use it.

I would be willing to bet that 90 percent of the people that ask questions about this stuff on here all knew the answer to their question at one point in time in high school. They probably had to pass a test on it...

It's just interesting to think about it.
robbie

Joined: Apr 23 2006
Posts: 5754


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Post Fri Apr 04, 2008 1:01 pm

Well i never took any kind of electrical class in highschool. And the science classes never taught it. So i suck there. Thats why i ask you guys. icon_biggrin.gif
mx107marlin

Joined: Aug 12 2007
Posts: 3095
Location: Fairborn, OH


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Post Fri Apr 04, 2008 8:53 pm

I dunno, our physical science class had a basic electrical unit, that talked about series and parallel circuits, all that. Plus it covered Ohm's law, (the basis of what we use around here)

Then my physics class had a whole schematics unit, where we had to calculate the load, voltage and resistance on a schematic of like 60 parts...
Jump1979man

Joined: Apr 03 2008
Posts: 4


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Post Sat Apr 05, 2008 9:06 am

PwrRngr wrote:
Well, it doesn't say the current draw on the page but I bet I can figure it out. Looking at the picture there are 6 LEDs and two resistors on each module. So, I'm assuming there are two "branches" in parallel with 3 LEDs in each "branch." I would say each module would pull 40mA each. Since you're using two, wire them in parallel and it'll pull 80mA.

Resistance = (Voltage)/(Current)

Say you want a 5-7 volt drop on the running lights. That would put the resistance anywhere from 60-80 ohms.



Thanks, I will see what I can come up with.
ozzie84

Joined: Jan 29 2008
Posts: 25


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Post Mon Apr 14, 2008 6:51 am

wow...i know this is a stupid question....ill say "sorry" before hand
how do i wire resistors and what are they?
and im trying to do the same thing as Jump1979man but w/ a red led strip and on a moped (08 honda ruckus)
Chris

Joined: Sep 27 2004
Posts: 2395
Location: NY


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Post Mon Apr 14, 2008 7:11 am

A resistor is a two-terminal electrical or electronic component that opposes an electric current by producing a voltage drop between its terminals. - wikipedia definition.

Basically, the resistor drops the voltage down to what you need. Depending on which LED you are using, different voltages are needed or else the LED will blow.

For the LED strip, a resistor is not needed to power steady on. The resistors are pre-wired within the actual LED strip.

If I am thinking right, the resistor rated at 60-80 ohms will reduce the voltage being allowed to the LED strip. This will in effect reduce the brightness. If you hook the resistor to your brake wire, it will be reducing the current voltage (12v) to around 7v.

To wire the resistor is simple. Just get some heat shrink tubing, solder, a soldering gun and the resistor. Attach your scooters brake light wire to the resistor. Solder it on, then cover it with the shrink tubing. Hook the other end of the resistor to the LED strip and BOOM. You should be done.

If you actually heard the BOOM, something bad happened.

I might have misused the word voltage with resistance. Hopefully pwr rngr will clarify this.
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
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Post Mon Apr 14, 2008 7:11 am

ozzie84 wrote:
wow...i know this is a stupid question....ill say "sorry" before hand
how do i wire resistors and what are they?
and im trying to do the same thing as Jump1979man but w/ a red led strip and on a moped (08 honda ruckus)


This is a picture of many common resistors....
User posted image
Most people wire them to the positive wire for their LEDs for convenience and to avoid confusion. To wire the LED strip and resistor in series here's what you do.

Find the correct power wire you're going to use (running lights for this application). Tap into that wire and connect one side of the resistor to that. Connect the other side of the resistor to the positive of the LED strip. Connect the negative of the LED strip to ground and it should work.
ozzie84

Joined: Jan 29 2008
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Post Mon Apr 14, 2008 12:26 pm

will this still keep the running lights? or just brake?
and how would i know what resistor to get?
Chris

Joined: Sep 27 2004
Posts: 2395
Location: NY


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Post Mon Apr 14, 2008 1:02 pm

This will keep the running lights constantly on, dimmer than it usually is due to the resistor.

The brake will come on with the brake, full brightness.

The package of the resistor should say what it is rated at. Get the one that is 60-80ohms
ozzie84

Joined: Jan 29 2008
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Post Mon Apr 14, 2008 1:26 pm

but i thought brake lights had 3 wires (running, brake, and ground)
thanks for the help guys, im trying to learn as much as i can,
therefore im sorry for being such a novice
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
Posts: 4407


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Post Mon Apr 14, 2008 1:31 pm

ozzie84 wrote:
but i thought brake lights had 3 wires (running, brake, and ground)
thanks for the help guys, im trying to learn as much as i can,
therefore im sorry for being such a novice


Correct, there should be three wires. You should connect the running wire to the resistor and then to the positive of the LED strip. You should also connect the brake wire to the positive of the LED strip (no resistor on this wire). Then connect the negative from the LED strip to either the ground wire or bare metal.
gin0o0o

Joined: Jan 21 2007
Posts: 33


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Post Mon Apr 14, 2008 3:01 pm

Thanks to you guys I can start my led brake lights on my car since my tails are tinted dark. I don't want to get rear ended.
ozzie84

Joined: Jan 29 2008
Posts: 25


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Post Wed Apr 16, 2008 6:53 am

i tested it out (ripping some from my car) and it works....really good i might say.
now i ordered 3 different led strips for my brake light and signals....cant wait to hook it all up
and then ill post pics....THANKS FOR ALL YA'LLS HELP....greatly appreciated icon_biggrin.gif
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
Posts: 4407


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Post Wed Apr 16, 2008 7:06 am

ozzie84 wrote:
i tested it out (ripping some from my car) and it works....really good i might say.
now i ordered 3 different led strips for my brake light and signals....cant wait to hook it all up
and then ill post pics....THANKS FOR ALL YA'LLS HELP....greatly appreciated icon_biggrin.gif


Glad we could help. Post pictures when you're done.
ozzie84

Joined: Jan 29 2008
Posts: 25


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Post Mon Apr 21, 2008 8:36 am

DONE!!!!!thanks for all of your help...

brake:
User posted image

signals:
User posted image
User posted image
Chris

Joined: Sep 27 2004
Posts: 2395
Location: NY


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Post Mon Apr 21, 2008 8:47 am

Are the signals orange? They looks red.

Glad it worked out though!
robbie

Joined: Apr 23 2006
Posts: 5754


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Post Mon Apr 21, 2008 8:49 am

I think they look pretty orange. Maybe the glow from the red bleeding over and making it look red?

In any case looks good i love it.
ozzie84

Joined: Jan 29 2008
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Post Mon Apr 21, 2008 10:34 am

yeah there orange.....

and thanks, im so freakin happy it worked icon_biggrin.gif
blue one

Joined: Jan 27 2008
Posts: 573
Location: Las Vegas


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Post Mon Apr 21, 2008 7:27 pm

good job, you did great.
micbergsma

Joined: Mar 28 2008
Posts: 7
Location: Austin, Texas


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Post Thu Apr 24, 2008 8:15 pm

ozzie84 wrote:
does anyone know if its possible to make any led strip, or pods into a brake light????
if it can....it would be installed on my honda ruckus(moped)


oh man... icon_rolleyes.gif
it's not a MOPED.... you call it SCOOTER.... moped have little motor on bottom of the frame with PEDS.....

I have three scooters that I did a lot of LEDs mods on them
suzuki burgman
honda reflex
piaggio fly

anyway.. you can see the pictures what I made extra tail/brake lights on them, maybe that will give you some ideas

www.burgmanusa.com/gallery/micbergsma
micbergsma

Joined: Mar 28 2008
Posts: 7
Location: Austin, Texas


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Post Thu Apr 24, 2008 8:21 pm

hey! I love what you did to your ruckus!!! very cool!! you should get rid of front signals and do same way like you did on rear!!
ozzie84

Joined: Jan 29 2008
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Post Mon Apr 28, 2008 2:51 pm

yeah im trying to figure it out, cuz its not quite the same.....cuz when i installed the front ones...all the leds start flashing (like emergency lights)....but if im successfull, ill post it here
ozzie84

Joined: Jan 29 2008
Posts: 25


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Post Wed May 07, 2008 7:09 am

fixed it and the all the blinkers are installed..front,side,back.....ill take some pics tonight and see if i can post them
ozzie84

Joined: Jan 29 2008
Posts: 25


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Post Wed May 07, 2008 9:48 pm

even better heres of the video of the front signals, and the relocated tails, cuz of the shortened seat frame
User posted image
User posted image
90profx

Joined: May 14 2008
Posts: 6
Location: S.W. Ohio


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Post Thu Jun 12, 2008 12:20 pm

This is some great info, but I like others slept through class that day when they covered "Ohm's Law & Electrical 101".

I've got a tail light install that will use the 1 watt LED Flood for brake, running and park lighting. What resistor would a 1 watt LED use in order to have it dim to a running light brightness.

Thanks,
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
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Post Thu Jun 12, 2008 3:51 pm

90profx wrote:
This is some great info, but I like others slept through class that day when they covered "Ohm's Law & Electrical 101".

I've got a tail light install that will use the 1 watt LED Flood for brake, running and park lighting. What resistor would a 1 watt LED use in order to have it dim to a running light brightness.

Thanks,


1 watt at 12V means it draws ~83mA.

Lets say you only put 7V across the LEDs for the running lights. That would mean you would need ~65 ohm resistor. A larger resistor will make it dimmer while a smaller resistor will make it brighter. This also assumes that the running lights are a full 12V.
lbjshaq2345

Joined: Jul 11 2007
Posts: 1524
Location: Jonesborough, TN


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Post Thu Jun 12, 2008 8:27 pm

I like, looks very nice.
90profx

Joined: May 14 2008
Posts: 6
Location: S.W. Ohio


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Post Sun Jun 22, 2008 12:49 pm

PwrRngr wrote:
90profx wrote:
This is some great info, but I like others slept through class that day when they covered "Ohm's Law & Electrical 101".

I've got a tail light install that will use the 1 watt LED Flood for brake, running and park lighting. What resistor would a 1 watt LED use in order to have it dim to a running light brightness.

Thanks,


1 watt at 12V means it draws ~83mA.

Lets say you only put 7V across the LEDs for the running lights. That would mean you would need ~65 ohm resistor. A larger resistor will make it dimmer while a smaller resistor will make it brighter. This also assumes that the running lights are a full 12V.


*************************************************************

Thank you very much !!!!! icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif

I picked up some 68 ohm resistors and it works perfectly.

I really appreciate it very much !!!!!!! icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif
90profx

Joined: May 14 2008
Posts: 6
Location: S.W. Ohio


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Post Wed Jun 25, 2008 2:46 pm

I wired the 68 ohm resistors in line on the positive side. Is it normal for them to run hot, IR thermometer checks each one at 160 degrees. I tried to simulate driving light conditions for 8 hours. They heat up quickly and stay at that temp. Is the temp issue something to be concerned with or totally normal ?

Thanks
PwrRngr

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Post Wed Jun 25, 2008 6:49 pm

90profx wrote:
I wired the 68 ohm resistors in line on the positive side. Is it normal for them to run hot, IR thermometer checks each one at 160 degrees. I tried to simulate driving light conditions for 8 hours. They heat up quickly and stay at that temp. Is the temp issue something to be concerned with or totally normal ?

Thanks


I would say make sure your resistor is at least a 1/2W or 1W resistor. If you bought 1/4W resistors (and have at least 3 left) and don't have any 1/2W or 1W resistors let me know and I'll let you know how to wire them to handle the power.
90profx

Joined: May 14 2008
Posts: 6
Location: S.W. Ohio


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Post Thu Jun 26, 2008 4:53 am

Due to my total ignorance of resistors, based on what you told me, I went to Radio Shack and just looked for 65 Ohm's on the package. I found these that I've used, marked 68 Ohm. I didn't realize that I'd have to find these in a certain watt range (my bad) icon_cry.gif icon_cry.gif .

So please help a electrical dummy out here, what is it "exactly" I need to find to reduce the heat factor as well as provide the proper load I'm looking for ???????? If there are several options I can use, please let me know those as well. I'm obviously in way over my head on this because I had no idea of the complexity involved.

My goal was to make this as simple as possible without having to get real complex on this project since it seems I've already bit off more than I can chew icon_redface.gif .

And once again I owe you for your valuable help, it's very much appreciated. icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif

Thx
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
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Post Thu Jun 26, 2008 8:16 am

90profx wrote:
Due to my total ignorance of resistors, based on what you told me, I went to Radio Shack and just looked for 65 Ohm's on the package. I found these that I've used, marked 68 Ohm. I didn't realize that I'd have to find these in a certain watt range (my bad) icon_cry.gif icon_cry.gif .

So please help a electrical dummy out here, what is it "exactly" I need to find to reduce the heat factor as well as provide the proper load I'm looking for ???????? If there are several options I can use, please let me know those as well. I'm obviously in way over my head on this because I had no idea of the complexity involved.

My goal was to make this as simple as possible without having to get real complex on this project since it seems I've already bit off more than I can chew icon_redface.gif .

And once again I owe you for your valuable help, it's very much appreciated. icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif

Thx


No problem, look on the resistor package if you still have it and see what the power rating is. It should say something like "Resistors 68 ohm 1/4W" I'm just going to assume that they are 1/4W resistors since those are the most common. If they are something else post again and let me know.

Option 1: This is the easiest way to fix the problem. Go out and buy at least one, 68 ohm resistor that's 1/2W or 1W. The larger the power handling of the resistor, the cooler it will be. I would recommend getting a 1W resistor if you're going to buy a new one. This resistor will just replace the current resistor you have.

Option 2: I'm assuming you're resistors came in a pack of 5-10 resistors. This means you should have at least 3-4 left over. You'll want to wire the resistors as shown in this crude "drawing." Work blocks all photo hosting sites so I can't upload a diagram.

-----(Resistor)-----(Resistor)-----
| |
----- -----
| |
-----(Resistor)-----(Resistor)-----

When wired this way the overall resistance stays the same and each resistor is still only handling 1/4W. But overall, you'll be safe up to 1/2W.

The second option assumes your current resistors are 1/4W. If they are different let me know and I'll revise my post to work for whatever you have. I originally should have checked the power required for the resistors and let you know that as well as the resistance. That was my bad.

*EDIT* I don't know how to get that stupid "drawing" to work how it should. It should basically be two sets of resistors wires in series. This means wire the end of one resistor to the end of another resistor which will creat a "branch" containing 2 resistors. You'll want two of these "branches." Next, wire the two "branches" in parallel. This means wire one end of one "branch" to the end of the other "branch." Then, wire the other end of the first "branch" to the other end of the second "branch." Hopefully with terrible "drawing" that didn't work and this explaination you'll fixure it out. The "drawing" is just missing spaces, that's why it didn't turn out.
90profx

Joined: May 14 2008
Posts: 6
Location: S.W. Ohio


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Post Thu Jun 26, 2008 9:19 am

Ok, I'll attempt to see if I can locate 1W (preferred) or 1/2W resistors @ 65-68 Ohm's as a starting point. I want to find the 1W resistors if at all possible, that's my goal. I'll wire those up and see what the tempature drop amounts to. I'm out of town for a week so I'll post again upon my return.

As always, thank you for be so supportive of electrial idiot's like me. icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif
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