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black car = im scared to wash it

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justin

Joined: Jan 15 2004
Posts: 5061
Location: Madison


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Post Thu Jul 24, 2008 5:19 pm

I *REALLY* don't want to screw the PT's paint up. Its damn near perfect. I would hate to treat it badly, especially now that the front end is all covered up with PPF - don't want to create a stark contrast between the protected and unprotected.


^^ IT NEEDS TO LOOK LIKE THIS FOREVER!!! icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif ^^

I don't have the means to wash at home, just not gonna happen.

What is the best way to keep the awful swirl marks off the brand new looking paint? Is this possible just using the self-serve car wash and the proper microfiber/detergent?

Thanks.
Tdawgthegreatest

Joined: Jul 22 2007
Posts: 5093
Location: Florence, Oregon


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Post Thu Jul 24, 2008 5:23 pm

wax is your friend icon_smile.gif
corvettecrazy

Joined: Dec 17 2003
Posts: 4357
Location: moved (twice)


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Post Thu Jul 24, 2008 5:56 pm

2 bucket wash method
a NICE wash mit
proper wash method
seperate towels/cleaning devices for paint, glass, wheels, lower panels, wheel wells
super plush microfiber drying towels

never touch the paint with anything unless it is either super lubricated or perfectly clean

a true wax will not fix scratches. the crap off the shelf is filled with fillers that fill all the little swirl marks to make them temporarily harder to see. It doesn't fix them though.

Although if it is clean (as in clay barred and the paint feels as smooth as a clean crystal wine glass) layers of wax will help protect it from every day life and the enviroment.
Tat2Dragons

Joined: Jan 21 2007
Posts: 3404
Location: Baltimore Maryland


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Post Fri Jul 25, 2008 3:14 am

justin wrote:
I *REALLY* don't want to screw the PT's paint up. Its damn near perfect. I would hate to treat it badly, especially now that the front end is all covered up with PPF - don't want to create a stark contrast between the protected and unprotected.


^^ IT NEEDS TO LOOK LIKE THIS FOREVER!!! icon_biggrin.gif icon_biggrin.gif ^^

I don't have the means to wash at home, just not gonna happen.

What is the best way to keep the awful swirl marks off the brand new looking paint? Is this possible just using the self-serve car wash and the proper microfiber/detergent?

Thanks.


Well if there is simply no way you can hand wash your ride at home,I guess your only option is to use the self service car washes.So if you must...it is quite possible to keep your paint looking great using this means of washing.I should know as I've been doing it for quite a few years now,on various vehicles.Currently I have an black vehicle and with a few simple steps,I continue to get nothing but excellent results.If the owner is actually cool with it,and they aren't too busy...than yes you could do the two bucket method in the self serve wash bay.Just bring all your supplies with you,such as car wash soap,buckets,wash mit and so on,and basically use their water.Now if you can't hand wash your vehicle there,and you must use their soap and brush...then thats fine too.If your going to be washing this way,then make sure you find a car wash that has quality brushes.such as boars hair,or even the cheaper horse hair brushes.Not all will have quality brushes,so you might have to scope out your local area washes to see whom has the highest quality brushes.Here are some of the steps that I like to use while washing at self serve places.I first spray down the entire vehicle from the top down with the pressure gun on the soap setting,after doing so and before switching the setting,I always pick up the brush and rinse it extremely well,as you never know..besides dirt from the previously washed vehicle,what is actually stuck/caked in those bristles.After I'm quite confident that the brush is rinsed clean,I switch the setting to the foaming brush and get to washing...from the top down.When finished,I switch to the rinse setting and...you guessed it,get to rinsing.That's pretty much it for the basic washing at a self serve car wash.Oh also take note that most car washes use fairly strong soaps,so you'll more then likely need to wax more frequently then usual.I do this anyway so it not that big of a deal to me.After drying my vehicle and a quick little drive to get rid of those pesky drips,I always like to wipe the finish down with a quick detailer to bring that pop back in the finish.icon_smile.gif puppy_dog_eyes.gif icon_cool.gif
corvettecrazy

Joined: Dec 17 2003
Posts: 4357
Location: moved (twice)


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Post Fri Jul 25, 2008 3:25 am

If you are going to hand wash in a self serve bay bring your buckets already filled with soapy water.

Having worked in a car wash, even most rinse stages of self serve bay have drying agents and waxes in them. Not that they will harm your paint but dont think it is plain water.

Also, never never never use the brushes if you care about your paint. I dont care how nice the car wash is, or how well you rinse it. You have no idea if 2 cars before you was the muddiest and dirtiest truck you have ever seen.
Kierra

Joined: Mar 01 2008
Posts: 1345
Location: Cherry Hill, South Jersey


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Post Fri Jul 25, 2008 6:31 am

corvettecrazy wrote:
2 bucket wash method
a NICE wash mit
proper wash method
seperate towels/cleaning devices for paint, glass, wheels, lower panels, wheel wells
super plush microfiber drying towels

never touch the paint with anything unless it is either super lubricated or perfectly clean

a true wax will not fix scratches. the crap off the shelf is filled with fillers that fill all the little swirl marks to make them temporarily harder to see. It doesn't fix them though.

Although if it is clean (as in clay barred and the paint feels as smooth as a clean crystal wine glass) layers of wax will help protect it from every day life and the enviroment.

.
x2
Tat2Dragons

Joined: Jan 21 2007
Posts: 3404
Location: Baltimore Maryland


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Post Fri Jul 25, 2008 11:43 am

corvettecrazy wrote:
If you are going to hand wash in a self serve bay bring your buckets already filled with soapy water.

Having worked in a car wash, even most rinse stages of self serve bay have drying agents and waxes in them. Not that they will harm your paint but dont think it is plain water.

Also, never never never use the brushes if you care about your paint. I dont care how nice the car wash is, or how well you rinse it. You have no idea if 2 cars before you was the muddiest and dirtiest truck you have ever seen.


I've been to/used various carwashes and have spoken to many a car wash owner about their rinse water and mostly all I've found...use fresh/clean rinse water and the only time that any drying,or wax agents are in the rinse water cycle...is when it's on those actual settings.It's not coming through the pressure wand during a regular rinse setting.Maybe the car wash you worked at was different,but this is what I've been told many times. icon_neutral.gif Also,I can't stress enough how important it is to check and cleanly rinse the brush before use.You say you have no idea if the two cars before you were the muddiest and dirtiest truck you ever seen,but that is one of the many finer points of using an quality car wash,as they don't allow vehicles covered in mud to be washed in their bays.Although that doesn't mean that people don't actually do it anyway. puppy_dog_eyes.gif So if the bay is covered in mud,or extremely dirty and the brush doesn't look up to your standards,then hey...pull into a cleaner wash bay,or find another nice car wash. icon_cool.gif
justin

Joined: Jan 15 2004
Posts: 5061
Location: Madison


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Post Fri Jul 25, 2008 12:34 pm

I wouldn't use the supplied brush for anything other than a dirty set of steel wheels. And maybe not even then.
Losing quickly

Joined: Apr 26 2005
Posts: 5706
Location: SC


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Post Fri Jul 25, 2008 12:44 pm

Reminds me that I need to wash the fit....
Tat2Dragons

Joined: Jan 21 2007
Posts: 3404
Location: Baltimore Maryland


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Post Fri Jul 25, 2008 3:01 pm

justin wrote:
I wouldn't use the supplied brush for anything other than a dirty set of steel wheels. And maybe not even then.


Well do as you please....I just thought that since it seemed you didn't have much alternatives to using self sevice car washes,that I'd try to help you out with a few little tips that obviously work for me.All well...I tryed. icon_confused.gif icon_lol.gif
bad venge

Joined: Jul 28 2007
Posts: 3550


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Post Wed Jul 30, 2008 2:18 pm

Keys to keeping a black vehicle clean and swirl free....
Wash often start at the top and work your way down ,be sure to keep rinsing out your sponge/mitt to keep dirt from being rubbed in ...I use two mitts one to wash the top down to the belt line and another to clean below the belt...
Get a California Water Blade it helps dry the car quickly,and keeps it from water spotting ...
Learn to use a claybar to help keep contaminents from getting into/on the paint
Get a GOOD polish and a buffer ...(I use 3M pro line)
Also find a GOOD wax that you like ....(I use Collinite)
Plan on spending a good day every couple of months for a top to bottom polish and buff/wax
kornholio788

Joined: May 02 2005
Posts: 9748
Location: Tosa, WI


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Post Wed Jul 30, 2008 2:34 pm

If you buff that car every couple months say good bye to your clear. Remember that is cutting into your clear coat. Sooner or later you are going to cut through it.
bad venge

Joined: Jul 28 2007
Posts: 3550


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Post Wed Jul 30, 2008 2:39 pm

I've been doing it since 98 ... still not thru it yet
kornholio788

Joined: May 02 2005
Posts: 9748
Location: Tosa, WI


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Post Wed Jul 30, 2008 2:56 pm

bad venge wrote:
I've been doing it since 98 ... still not thru it yet


Then you are really buffing. Just giving it a light polish. Trust me dude. I work in this industry I know what I am talking about.
corvettecrazy

Joined: Dec 17 2003
Posts: 4357
Location: moved (twice)


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Post Wed Jul 30, 2008 5:18 pm

Also, if you are maintaining your paint properly you should NOT need to "buff" it more than once a year or so.

Water blade = instant marring and scratches.
ShadowBOX

Joined: Feb 26 2008
Posts: 856
Location: Fort Wayne, IN


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Post Wed Jul 30, 2008 11:05 pm

I use a jelly blade to remove any beaded water before I dry it with a big microfiber towel. Never had problems with it yet.

I also use the brush, but only at my favorite local spot. Its always in great shape and I spray it down for like a solid 30 seconds to make sure there isn't anything buried in it.
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