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led strips keep "burning out"

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mcpsh

Joined: Jan 24 2009
Posts: 17
Location: bay area


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Post Mon Mar 09, 2009 3:54 pm

Hi,

I have the flexible led lights strips. I have wired them into my cig lighter. For some reason they seem to keep (burning out) going out (not sure whats it's called). Does anyone have any idea why this is. Do I need to add in resistors somewhere. i thought the strips were already set that way.

any advice is appreciated.

I can show you pics or provide more info if it would help.

Thanks.
Focal Fury

Joined: Jan 18 2005
Posts: 465


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Post Mon Mar 09, 2009 4:13 pm

I see we already sent you replacements, we don't have many problems with the 4.7" Flex LED Strips.
How did the replacements work out?

Danny Myers
OZ Support
mcpsh

Joined: Jan 24 2009
Posts: 17
Location: bay area


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Post Mon Mar 09, 2009 4:26 pm

Well the replacements showed up the next (which is awesome, A+++ customer service), but last night I noticed a flickering and when I looked at the light 3 of the leds we're flickering (looked like they were on their last leg). that's why i was posting here, to see if I maybe had something set up wrong etc. is it normal when these go out for them to go out in set's of three. It's never just one bulb that goes out, but always three at a time that are affected.

I can provide pics or more details, but any help is appreciated.

On a side note, I found a use for the old strips, but an additional 3 bulbs burned out in those as well. Out of a total of 24 bulbs (2 4.7 strips) there are only 9 lights remaining.
Aken

Joined: Feb 12 2003
Posts: 10885


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Post Mon Mar 09, 2009 4:27 pm

Yes, they'll go out in threes. They're wired that way.

How are you mounting them? Is it possible you're doing something like pinching the strips too hard with zip ties or something?
mcpsh

Joined: Jan 24 2009
Posts: 17
Location: bay area


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Post Mon Mar 09, 2009 4:30 pm

Haven't permanently mounted them yet (after the issue with the first set). I've been using velcro adhesive strips, so I don't think pinching is the problem.

any other ideas?
corvettecrazy

Joined: Dec 17 2003
Posts: 4357
Location: moved (twice)


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Post Mon Mar 09, 2009 4:42 pm

Do you have any idea what voltage you are feeding them?
mcpsh

Joined: Jan 24 2009
Posts: 17
Location: bay area


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Post Mon Mar 09, 2009 4:52 pm

this is hooked up through the wiring for the car's cig lighter which from my understanding should be a 12V power supply. The fuse for this circuit is a 20amp. i didn't wire one in my self, it's just the normal fuse in the car's fuse box.
Aken

Joined: Feb 12 2003
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Post Mon Mar 09, 2009 4:57 pm

It sounds like just a couple bad strips in a row. It happens.
alienyoungjr

Joined: Apr 30 2004
Posts: 4654
Location: Texas


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Post Mon Mar 09, 2009 8:42 pm

You need to test your car's voltage. Cars almost never run off of just 12v. The alternator usually puts out around 14v, and the battery is at 12v. Test your voltage.

If the problem continues you can add a small resistor. You can try either a 15ohm 1/2watt or 30ohm 1/2watt resistor on them to see if that helps combat the problem.
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
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Post Tue Mar 10, 2009 3:18 am

alienyoungjr wrote:
You need to test your car's voltage. Cars almost never run off of just 12v. The alternator usually puts out around 14v, and the battery is at 12v. Test your voltage.

If the problem continues you can add a small resistor. You can try either a 15ohm 1/2watt or 30ohm 1/2watt resistor on them to see if that helps combat the problem.

Here's the thing with that (and I'm not say you're incorrect in any way b/c you aren't), these strips are designed for automotive lighting. It's well known that the actual voltage isn't 12V, it's ~14V. The strips should be designed for 14V.

One shouldn't need to add a resistor to a product that's used as designed. But, that's just my 2 cents.
Focal Fury

Joined: Jan 18 2005
Posts: 465


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Post Tue Mar 10, 2009 6:21 am

A resistor is NOT NECESSARY whatsoever.
I've fired these up in the warehouse to 20V before it failed...........i was bored k!!!

I'm happy to send you another set of replacements.....I do apologize for the continued troubles.

Let me know if this works for you!

Danny
OZ Support!
mcpsh

Joined: Jan 24 2009
Posts: 17
Location: bay area


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Post Tue Mar 10, 2009 7:30 am

Thanks for all of the advice. I thought I had everything basically right, but as I'm not an expert I thought maybe I had missed something or overlooked something. It's just great that this board exists and everyone is willing to be so helpful.


Danny,
I'll keep an eye on them and if it seems like the strip (only one of the new ones seems to be having this problem) goes out I'll let you know. Right now it's just flickering from time to time, but that's what happened with the other 2 before they went out.
alienyoungjr

Joined: Apr 30 2004
Posts: 4654
Location: Texas


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Post Tue Mar 10, 2009 11:10 am

You can also try a 12v regulator and see if that helps. Its possible that you are getting voltage spikes that are buring them up.




PwrRngr wrote:
alienyoungjr wrote:
You need to test your car's voltage. Cars almost never run off of just 12v. The alternator usually puts out around 14v, and the battery is at 12v. Test your voltage.

If the problem continues you can add a small resistor. You can try either a 15ohm 1/2watt or 30ohm 1/2watt resistor on them to see if that helps combat the problem.

Here's the thing with that (and I'm not say you're incorrect in any way b/c you aren't), these strips are designed for automotive lighting. It's well known that the actual voltage isn't 12V, it's ~14V. The strips should be designed for 14V.

One shouldn't need to add a resistor to a product that's used as designed. But, that's just my 2 cents.


I completly agree with you. One shouldn't have to do that.
pgiordano

Joined: Nov 13 2008
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Post Tue Mar 10, 2009 12:34 pm

what is the tolerance level on the resistors installed on the strips cause if it is high he could of got some border line resistors ... i know its not likely just throwin ideas out there
alienyoungjr

Joined: Apr 30 2004
Posts: 4654
Location: Texas


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Post Tue Mar 10, 2009 2:39 pm

The typical cause for LEDs failure is called thermal runaway. Its when an LED get too hot and starts to eat more and more current until its ultimate failure. The resistors are calculated for a certain voltage, and it could be set too high which would be fine, but it could be set too low and thats where the problem will be. LEDs can handle higher than normal voltages but only for a certain length of time. The LED under too much voltage will start to heat up, and then the current will start to rise as the LED goes into thermal runaway.

If you current regulate an LED then the voltage will be controlled by the LED itself. ICELED does this in all of their products. They control the current instead of the voltage. It eliminates that problem. But there is a lot more quality control put into ICELED that makes it more reliable.
djkosy

Joined: Mar 10 2009
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Post Tue Mar 10, 2009 7:55 pm

I'm about to put my led strip over my headlight to give the effect of halos but I was wondering how much Amp those 1 foot of led strip can support. because I tested them on a battery charger and it gave a different amplitude to the light wether I was at 2 amp or 10amp

how should I wired mine I want them to open as soon as I fire the car

thanks
alienyoungjr

Joined: Apr 30 2004
Posts: 4654
Location: Texas


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Post Tue Mar 10, 2009 9:33 pm

they will use whatever amperage they use. you can control it tomake sure they don't go out of bounds, or you could just install them and let them run on their own. you could build a current regulator, but thats up to you. if i was having that much trouble with other strips i would do that.
djkosy

Joined: Mar 10 2009
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Post Wed Mar 11, 2009 2:33 am

Then why would the light output change when I switched from 2 to 10amp does it mean they usually use 10amp for two feet of flezx led strip

and by the way I'm not the one that had problems with mine

at least not yet lol
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
Posts: 4407


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Post Wed Mar 11, 2009 3:28 am

It changed because you tested them on a battery charger and not a power supply. A charger will adjust the current depending on the load it "sees." Switching it to 10A just gave it a higher charge rate for a given load. This just allowed it to feed more current to the LED load.

Flexible LED strips are 160mA (0.16A) for the 9.5" and 320mA (0.32A) for the 19"
mcpsh

Joined: Jan 24 2009
Posts: 17
Location: bay area


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Post Wed Mar 11, 2009 11:51 am

alienyoungjr wrote:
The typical cause for LEDs failure is called thermal runaway. Its when an LED get too hot and starts to eat more and more current until its ultimate failure. The resistors are calculated for a certain voltage, and it could be set too high which would be fine, but it could be set too low and thats where the problem will be. LEDs can handle higher than normal voltages but only for a certain length of time. The LED under too much voltage will start to heat up, and then the current will start to rise as the LED goes into thermal runaway.

If you current regulate an LED then the voltage will be controlled by the LED itself. ICELED does this in all of their products. They control the current instead of the voltage. It eliminates that problem. But there is a lot more quality control put into ICELED that makes it more reliable.


When an LED starts to heat up, does it appear to be dimmer? Just asking as it seemed like the leds got dimmer before they began flickering and ultimately burning out.

BTW - just as an update for those interested. One of the 2 new strips is still goin fine. the other has three lights that are flickering (I'm guessing they burn out soon). As to the original two strips I had, both have 3 out of 12 led in working condition, although one of them from time to time will suddenly light up 9 of the leds (this only lasts for about a 1-2 seconds, then it flickers and dies).
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
Posts: 4407


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Post Wed Mar 11, 2009 12:00 pm

I'm guessing that the flickering LEDs are a loose connection in the strip. I've seen the loose connection issue appear on here a few times before. LEDs don't flicker before they die, they just don't light up anymore.
alienyoungjr

Joined: Apr 30 2004
Posts: 4654
Location: Texas


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Post Wed Mar 11, 2009 1:06 pm

if it is a loose connection try aply some pressure to the sides of the strips to see if that will get them to light up again.
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