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Sub Enclosure Size/Dimensions

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A-Ray

Joined: May 01 2005
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Location: Volunteer State


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Post Sun Nov 21, 2010 8:54 pm

So a buddy of mine has asked me to help him build an enclosure for his subs. He has 2 10" Memphis Audio subs. According to the Memphis Audio site, the optimal enclosure size for 2 10" subs is 1.5 cubic feet. All I need is a diagram on building the enclosure. So, who can help me out?
kornholio788

Joined: May 02 2005
Posts: 9748
Location: Tosa, WI


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Post Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:06 am

First figure out how much space the woofers take up unless you are mounting inverted.

Then use a simple calculator like this one to figure it out. Obviously adding in the sub space usage into the volume needed.

http://www.carstereo.com/help/Articles.cfm?id=5
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
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Post Mon Nov 22, 2010 6:03 am

Length x Width x Height

It really depends on the space you have to use. Is the space you have to use long and narrow? Wide and short? etc.
A-Ray

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Post Mon Nov 22, 2010 10:04 am

PwrRngr wrote:
Length x Width x Height

It really depends on the space you have to use. Is the space you have to use long and narrow? Wide and short? etc.


Its going in an 05 Chevy Impala so the trunk is pretty good sized. I'll look at it tonight and see what i can decided on that
A-Ray

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Post Mon Nov 22, 2010 10:18 am

The only questions/issue I have is that all the calculators only figure one sub being within the enclosure. Does having two subs effect the design any? I've never built a box for two subs, so thats why I question that.

Optimal size for sub is 1.5 cubic feet, with a box of 22 x 13 x 13, using 3/4 MDF I get a box of 1.569 cubic feet. Which, should work, right?
bad venge

Joined: Jul 28 2007
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Post Mon Nov 22, 2010 11:05 am

I'd build individual boxes to prevent cross feed / contamination you can screw them together just have 2 chambers
A-Ray

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Post Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:16 pm

bad venge wrote:
I'd build individual boxes to prevent cross feed / contamination you can screw them together just have 2 chambers


So your saying, build two individual boxes, 1 for each sub, then just screw them together making it appear as 1 box. Thats an interesting thought on things. Thanks for the inpu.
PwrRngr

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Post Mon Nov 22, 2010 1:57 pm

A-Ray wrote:
bad venge wrote:
I'd build individual boxes to prevent cross feed / contamination you can screw them together just have 2 chambers


So your saying, build two individual boxes, 1 for each sub, then just screw them together making it appear as 1 box. Thats an interesting thought on things. Thanks for the inpu.

That's what he's saying. I personally would build one box with two seperate air spaces. But if that's too complex for your building skill, build two seperate boxes.
bad venge

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Post Mon Nov 22, 2010 5:46 pm

It's easier to seal two boxes then try to insert a filler panel to seal perfectly
PwrRngr

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Post Mon Nov 22, 2010 5:58 pm

bad venge wrote:
It's easier to seal two boxes then try to insert a filler panel to seal perfectly

I disagree. The filler panel is no more difficult to add than the pieces on the end of the box. If you design a certain way, it can even be the same dimensions as the end pieces.

But I really disagree b/c everything should be glued to seal it (this means the filler panel). If you're not good at using a table saw, caulk is also very easy to use (all of your joints should be caulked anyways). I'm sure you've built several boxes so you should know that you aren't trying to insert a filler panel. You're building it into the box as it's assembled. It's not much different than building a cabinet.

Even with two boxes, you're going to have to seal around the screws with something.
bad venge

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Post Mon Nov 22, 2010 6:32 pm

I just find it easier to cut three ends then use one for the middle then use the cleats to hold the sides to it then fasten the ends to
Carl

Joined: Apr 04 2005
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Post Mon Nov 22, 2010 7:39 pm

1.5 cube, is that for one sub? 1 cube is 1728 in and 1.5 cube is 2592 in. Some companies include the magnet structure in the optimum box size while others want you to figure that into the equation. Also, if there is a minimum size box and maximum box recommended, Check on what style of bass your friend likes. The small enclosure makes tighter bass and the larger makes for a boomey or looser bass.
A-Ray

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Post Mon Nov 22, 2010 9:47 pm

After thinking about things a little, I was thinking that I could design and build essentially like you are saying PwrRngr, with the two end pieces and the filler panel all being the same size. That will most likely be the way I end up doing it.

Carl, the 1.5 cubic feet is what the manufacturer (Memphis Audio in this case) recommends as the optimal size for an enclosure containing 2 subs. And the size includes driver displacement.
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