Oznium.com Store
Oznium Forum
The value of this forum is in the interaction with your fellow LED lighting enthusiasts.
Register today! - It is FREE and quick

how do i power my LEDs from the fuse box?

Author
Message
chubs08

Joined: Mar 04 2008
Posts: 7


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Mon Mar 24, 2008 1:13 pm

I was just at a car specialist place and they said I should tap into the ignition cord and use a product like the ATC Fuse holder (https://www.oznium.com/install-bay/atc-fuse-holder) but i don't know what else I'm supposed to attach. And also which wire is which on the LEDs? I have 2 green flex strips (https://www.oznium.com/flexible-led-strips/led-flex-strips)
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
Posts: 4407


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Mon Mar 24, 2008 1:52 pm

You could do it that way if you wanted to but I would recommend another way. If you tap into your ignition wire then it's already fused. If you buy the fuse holder I would recommend running a new wire from the battery into the car. It's not hard to do and will allow you to expand your glow later (everyone does eventually). I'm not 100% sure about which wire is positive but I believe it's the silver wire. Read the FAQ on the flex strip product page and you will find it there.

If you're going to run a wire from the battery look through the forums for one of the Oz labs videos (maybe someone can post it here if they're feeling ambitious). Also, there's a thread that helps to determine what fuse size you will need.
SuBXeRo

Joined: Oct 31 2003
Posts: 1891
Location: River Edge NJ and Scottsdale AZ


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Mon Mar 24, 2008 2:40 pm

i would strongly advise agaisnt tapping into your cars electrical. It is always best to run new wiring for your addons. Your car is designed to work a certain way, the engineers didnt take into account you adding on lights and what not. Yes it will work but it can create alot of problems later on.

I dont know how familar you are with relays, but i did a little write up below on them.

if you do want to tape into the ignition wire so that you lights will always go off when your car is off, i recommend you use a relay. Relays use a marginal amount of current to flip a switch magnetically. The only strain on ur cars system would be the circuit you created with the relay which is a marginal amount of current.

Basic relays have 2 circuits. 1 to turn the relay on and 1 for your accessory. The accessory posts yould use the pos lead from your battery and it would then feed to your accessory. Think of a relay as a normal switch. Instead of turning it on by hand, electric turns it on for you.

basically like this:

Relay power circuit
1. ign pos wire to relay power pin 1
2. relay power pin 1 goes through to turn the circuit on and exits out relay power pin 2 as a neg lead which you ground to your car or battery

Acc Power Circuit
1. Run pos wire from battery to relay acc post 3
2. The pos wire goes across the bridge starting at acc post 3 to acc post 4 where it exits as a positive lead
3. Take the positive lead from pin 4 and run that to your acc. Then you need to ground your acc to the chassis or back to the battery.

now as for fusing the wire, make sure you add the fuse on the ACC power cord before it hits the relay. If there is a power surge and your fuse is after the relay, you have a good chance of frying the relay out. You should also fuse the relay on wire too just incase.

i hope this helped out, if you have any questions post in the thread of contact me by other means.
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
Posts: 4407


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Mon Mar 24, 2008 3:08 pm

SuBXeRo wrote:
now as for fusing the wire, make sure you add the fuse on the ACC power cord before it hits the relay. If there is a power surge and your fuse is after the relay, you have a good chance of frying the relay out. You should also fuse the relay on wire too just incase.


Just a clarification, your reasoning is incorrect. An electrical surge will increase the potential across the power supply which will in turn increase the current. Current flow will not increase starting with the device closest to the battery and then increase in the next device and then the next device, etc. Current will increase throughout the whole system at the same time.

Meaning...it doesn't matter where you place your fuse if you're concerened about a power surge as long as the fuse is on the same circuit as the device concerned about. You DO want to fuse before your devices because the goal is to prevent a short circuit. Any short before a fuse isn't protected by the fuse.
chubs08

Joined: Mar 04 2008
Posts: 7


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Mon Mar 24, 2008 7:34 pm

the other way i was thinking of running the LEDs was off the fuse box in the driver's side under the dash. My friend did his that way using an add-a-line but I'm not quite sure how to run that either. I'm going to have to ask him about it when hes free. What way would you guys recommend to wire the LEDs and what way is safer and easier?
SuBXeRo

Joined: Oct 31 2003
Posts: 1891
Location: River Edge NJ and Scottsdale AZ


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Mon Mar 24, 2008 8:26 pm

run the strips in parallel chubs. I really dont recommend you start **** with your fusebox. You don't seem to be eletrically knowledgable enough yet to start doing that. If you do tap into the ignition wire behind the fuse box make sure to run the relay. It will work without it, but its not something you want to get into the habit of doing. This is the reason why the relay was invented. Almost everything in your car is turned on via relays. Wipers, headlights, turn signals, window motors, and the list goes on.

PwrRngr - as a side note, current does have a direction
I have had contradicting ideas. 99% of the time i am taught to put the fuse on the pos lead. In my honors physics class in highschool we were taught that current flows from neg to pos.

Although I do see how current can be increased throughout the whole circuit, the source of the power has to increase in a particular direction. My guess is that it is done so suddenly that the whole system can be considered increased at the same time
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
Posts: 4407


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Mon Mar 24, 2008 9:03 pm

Chubs, I would second what SuBXeRo said. Wiring LEDs in parallel will allow the LEDs to remain lit in the event that one of them burns out. If you wire them in series if one burns out, the whole "chain" burns out (example, Christmas tree lights).

SuBXeRo wrote:
Although I do see how current can be increased throughout the whole circuit, the source of the power has to increase in a particular direction. My guess is that it is done so suddenly that the whole system can be considered increased at the same time


No, it's not done so suddenly that it can be considered the same time, it is EXACTLY the same time. Look at Kirkoff's current law, "the current entering and leaving a closed loop must always equal zero." I can go into the actual physic of electronics and electron movement to prove that it's the same time but that becomes very complex, so I'll really simplify it.

Yes, electric current does flow from negative to positive. This is because current is the rate of flow of electrons. Electrons are negatively charged and want to move toward a positive charge (opposites attract). Now, when a circuit is disconnected there are still electrons in the wire (hence why the wire isn't charged). When the circuit is connected, these electrons start to flow all at the same time and same rate. This means that current will always be the same through the entire circuit (assuming the circuit is a basic series circuit like being discussed).

BTW, I didn't learn this in High School Honors Physics class.; I learned this in Purdue's Electrical Engineering class.
SuBXeRo

Joined: Oct 31 2003
Posts: 1891
Location: River Edge NJ and Scottsdale AZ


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Mon Mar 24, 2008 10:12 pm

LOL, im a real estate major, honors physics was as far as i went into highschool, along with outside reading i do cause this **** is me hobby. What you said does make sense, it just doesnt make sense that everything is alwyas moving at the same time. But then again its impossible to pin point the location of an electron at any given time and light is both a wave and particle and it is thoeretically impossible to travel faster than the speed of light. and so goes physics lol
blue one

Joined: Jan 27 2008
Posts: 573
Location: Las Vegas


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Mon Mar 24, 2008 10:32 pm

hey chubs, since you already got info on the other stuff, about the wires on the flex strips.
the silver is positive and the copper is negative,
for some reason its backwards like that...

oh and this is late but welcome to Oz. ozzy_change.gif
chubs08

Joined: Mar 04 2008
Posts: 7


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Tue Mar 25, 2008 8:54 am

thanks for the help guys, I'm gonna try to get em installed sometime today and hopefully not break anything.
chubs08

Joined: Mar 04 2008
Posts: 7


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Tue Mar 25, 2008 9:01 am

i guess im still a little confused... where do i run each wire?
PwrRngr

Joined: Jul 19 2007
Posts: 4407


Are you sure you want to delete this post?
  
Post Tue Mar 25, 2008 11:04 am

Run the power wire from the battery into the cab of the car. You can then tap power off that to go to the positive side of the LED strips (or LEDs). Then attach a wire from the negative side of the LED and the frame or some piece of BARE metal.
The time now is Fri Jul 20, 2018 5:11 pm
Page 1 of 1