If you’re looking to connect different colored LED lights on a single strip, you’re going to run into series/parallel SMD LED wiring issues.

In short, the power supply must be equal to or more than the sum of the voltage requirements, per LED and its resistor. When you want to mix colors and wire them in parallel, then you need to add resistors to each LED, which levels the amount of power required to light the LEDs.

It’s important to remember that colored LEDs have different voltages and therefore require more or less of a power source and also that when you wire in parallel, you have to split the positive and negative lines into multiple wires.



Extra Information


craigp

I think I may have found my answer.

Connecting different colored LEDs

The power supply must be equal to or more than the sum of the voltage requirements for each LED and its resistor. If you want to mix colors and wire your LEDs in parallel, then you need to add the right resistor to each LED (not one for the entire circuit). This levels the amount of power required to illuminate each LED.


Aken

Correct. Mixing colors that do not require the same voltage requires using resistors to verify you don’t overpower the lower voltage colors.
For your problem, it sounds more like a wiring issue than anything. Verify that you have connected them properly. A crude/basic example:

corvettecrazy

craigp wrote:
Yes,
I also tested the LEDs one by one to ensure it wasnt a bad solder joint.

The next quest is the following:
Red 1.2 v
Green 2.2 v
Blue 3.2 v
Do I need different resistors to bring the voltage down depending on the power need of the specific color? (ie 1k for the Red and 2k for the Blue)
(These number are not exact)
Nice animation by the was Aken.
Not sure where you got the vf of the green LED or maybe you typed it incorrectly but it is wrong. It should be around 3.2v. Also, I would be shocked if red was 1.2. It is probably 1.7-2.2v

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